Abnormal Cat Poop Chart: What Your Cat’s Stool Says About Their Health

Cats are notorious for hiding their illnesses and discomforts, so it can be hard to tell if your feline friend is feeling well or not. One of the best ways to monitor your cat’s health is to check their poop regularly. The color, shape, consistency, and frequency of your cat’s stool can reveal a lot about their digestive system and overall well-being.

In this article, we will provide you with an abnormal cat poop chart that will help you identify common signs of trouble in your cat’s poop. We will also explain what causes these abnormalities and what you can do to help your cat. Remember, this article is not a substitute for veterinary advice. If you notice any changes in your cat’s poop that persist or worsen, you should consult your vet as soon as possible.

What is Normal Cat Poop?

Before we dive into the abnormal cat poop chart, let’s first establish what normal cat poop looks like. According to the Bristol Stool Chart, which is a medical tool used to classify human feces, normal cat poop should be type 2 or type 3, which means:

  • Type 2: Sausage-shaped but lumpy
  • Type 3: Like a sausage but with cracks on the surface

Normal cat poop should be brown in color, although some variations are acceptable depending on your cat’s diet. For example, if your cat eats a lot of meat, their poop may be darker than usual. If your cat eats a lot of vegetables, their poop may be lighter or have some green bits.

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Normal cat poop should also be firm but not hard, moist but not wet, and easy to scoop. Your cat should poop at least once a day, but not more than three times a day. Normal cat poop should not have any blood, mucus, worms, or foreign objects in it. It should also not have a very strong or foul odor, although some smell is normal.

Abnormal Cat Poop Chart

Now that you know what normal cat poop looks like, let’s take a look at the abnormal cat poop chart. This chart will help you identify some common problems in your cat’s poop and what they mean. Please note that this chart is not exhaustive and does not cover all possible scenarios. If you are unsure about your cat’s poop or have any concerns, you should always contact your vet.

Table

AbnormalityDescriptionPossible CausesWhat to Do
Type 1: Separate hard lumps, like nutsThis indicates that your cat is constipated and has difficulty passing stool.Dehydration, lack of fiber, hairballs, stress, medication, kidney disease, megacolon, etc.Increase your cat’s water intake, add some fiber to their diet, groom them regularly, reduce their stress, and consult your vet if the problem persists or worsens.
Type 4: Like a sausage or snake, smooth and softThis indicates that your cat has a healthy bowel movement and is well-hydrated.A balanced diet, adequate water intake, regular exercise, etc.Nothing, this is normal.
Type 5: Soft blobs with clear-cut edgesThis indicates that your cat has mild diarrhea and may have some inflammation in their colon.Dietary changes, food intolerance, stress, infection, parasites, inflammatory bowel disease, etc.Monitor your cat’s poop and behavior, make sure they drink enough water, avoid giving them dairy or other foods that may upset their stomach, and consult your vet if the problem persists or worsens.
Type 6: Fluffy pieces with ragged edges, a mushy stoolThis indicates that your cat has moderate diarrhea and may have some malabsorption issues.Dietary changes, food intolerance, stress, infection, parasites, inflammatory bowel disease, etc.Monitor your cat’s poop and behavior, make sure they drink enough water, avoid giving them dairy or other foods that may upset their stomach, and consult your vet if the problem persists or worsens.
Type 7: Watery, no solid pieces, entirely liquidThis indicates that your cat has severe diarrhea and may have a serious infection or disease.Dietary changes, food intolerance, stress, infection, parasites, inflammatory bowel disease, etc.Monitor your cat’s poop and behavior, make sure they drink enough water, avoid giving them dairy or other foods that may upset their stomach, and consult your vet immediately.
Black or tarryThis indicates that your cat has bleeding in their upper digestive tract, such as the stomach or small intestine.Ulcers, gastritis, foreign objects, poisoning, etc.Consult your vet immediately.
Red or bloodyThis indicates that your cat has bleeding in their lower digestive tract, such as the colon or rectum.Colitis, anal gland problems, polyps, tumors, etc.Consult your vet immediately.
White or grayThis indicates that your cat has a lack of bile in their stool, which may indicate a problem with their liver, gallbladder, or pancreas.Liver disease, gallstones, pancreatitis, etc.Consult your vet immediately.
GreenThis indicates that your cat has eaten a lot of grass or other green plants, or that their stool has passed through their digestive system too quickly.Dietary changes, stress, infection, etc.Monitor your cat’s poop and behavior, and consult your vet if the problem persists or worsens.
Yellow or orangeThis indicates that your cat has a problem with their liver or bile ducts, or that their stool has passed through their digestive system too quickly.Liver disease, gallstones, pancreatitis, etc.Consult your vet immediately.
MucusThis indicates that your cat has some inflammation or irritation in their colon, which may be a sign of infection, parasites, or inflammatory bowel disease.Colitis, infection, parasites, inflammatory bowel disease, etc.Monitor your cat’s poop and behavior, and consult your vet if the problem persists or worsens.
WormsThis indicates that your cat has a parasitic infection, such as roundworms, tapeworms, or hookworms.Ingestion of infected prey, fleas, soil, etc.Consult your vet immediately and get your cat dewormed.
Foreign objectsThis indicates that your cat has swallowed something that they shouldn’t have, such as a toy, a bone, a string, etc.Curiosity, boredom, pica, etc.Consult your vet immediately and get your cat x-rayed.

How to Create an Abnormal Cat Poop Chart

If you want to create your own abnormal cat poop chart, you can use the following steps:

  • Step 1: Gather some materials, such as a notebook, a pen, a ruler, and a camera.
  • Step 2: Check your cat’s litter box every day and observe their poop. Note down the date, time, color, shape, consistency, and frequency of their poop. You can also take a picture of their poop for reference.
  • Step 3: Compare your cat’s poop with the Bristol Stool Chart and the abnormal cat poop chart above. Identify any abnormalities and possible causes. If you are unsure or concerned, contact your vet.
  • Step 4: Draw a table with four columns and as many rows as you need. Label the columns as “Abnormality”, “Description”, “Possible Causes”, and “What to Do”.
  • Step 5: Fill in the table with the information you gathered from your cat’s poop. Use the abnormal cat poop chart above as a guide, but feel free to add or modify any details as needed.
  • Step 6: Review your table and look for any patterns or trends. For example, does your cat have diarrhea more often after eating a certain food? Does your cat have constipation more often when they are stressed? Does your cat have blood in their stool more often when they have a flea infestation?
  • Step 7: Use your table to help you take care of your cat and improve their health. For example, if your cat has diarrhea, make sure they drink enough water and avoid giving them dairy. If your cat has constipation, increase their water and fiber intake and groom them regularly. If your cat has worms, get them dewormed and prevent them from eating infected prey or fleas.
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Conclusion

Your cat’s poop can tell you a lot about their health and well-being. By checking their poop regularly and using an abnormal cat poop chart, you can identify any signs of trouble and take action accordingly. Remember, this article is not a substitute for veterinary advice. If you notice any changes in your cat’s poop that persist or worsen, you should consult your vet as soon as possible.

We hope you found this article helpful and informative. If you liked it, please share it with your fellow cat lovers. And if you have any questions or comments, please leave them below. Thank you for reading!